International Drain-the-Beer-Keg Day

IMG_1444Every fall, around the time the golf shop closes for the season, the Sunday Morning Group prepares for winter by spending a day finishing all the beer that’s left in the kegerator, so that the kegerator can “self-clean” over the winter. This year, finishing the beer was made extra challenging by the fact that all the beer in the kegerator had actually been finished the day before. The solution (devised by Chic and Mike A.) was to buy a new keg, and finish that:

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First, though, there were Bloody Marys and Jagermeister on the first tee:

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And, of course, we played our regular Sunday round, during which Tim D. secured his position as the year’s leading money winner:

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Then Justin helped Fritz and Tim C. run a hundred-foot-long cable from the golf shop to the clubhouse, so that we could watch football if anyone could figure out how to make the TV work. (No one could):

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Then, because there was still some beer left in the keg, we played a five-hole cross-country tournament, ten dollars a man:

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The format was two-man scramble — but if you or your partner lost a ball you had to switch to alternate shot, and if you lost that ball, too, you had to switch to the beer cart:

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We played from the first tee to the sixth green, then the fifth tee to the seventh green, then the eighth tee to the third green, and so on. Surprisingly many members of my club think our course closes when the golf shop does, if not on Labor Day, so hardly anybody got in our way. Plus, Corey, our pro, was playing with us. Here we are waiting on the second tee while two non-participants finish the first hole, which is about to be “in play”:

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Sad to say, the new keg ran out before the afternoon was over. Our local liquor store had closed already, so Dr. Mike had to drive to the next town to buy more. But everything worked out in the end.

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Report From the 2013 Men’s Member-Guest, Part Two

From left to right: plastic beer cups, Kegerator, ice chest containing non-beer-type beverages.

From left to right: plastic beer cups, Kegerator, ice chest containing non-beer-type beverages.

For the men’s member-guest in 2012, we spent hundreds of dollars on ice, and the beer kegs, after a while, dispensed nothing but foam. This year, we followed the example of Michael U.’s fraternity and bought two Kegerators, for about six hundred dollars each. Each one is a medium-size refrigerator whose only job is to keep a keg of beer cold.

Tony, attempting to use one or our new six-hundred-dollar Kegerators as a chair.

Tony, attempting to use one or our new six-hundred-dollar Kegerators as a chair.

Tony, after being told not to use one off our new six-hundred-dollar Kegerators as a chair.

Tony, after being told not to use one of our new six-hundred-dollar Kegerators as a chair.

While the matches were going on, we kept one of the Kegerators near the clubhouse and the other plugged in to an outlet in the pump house, by the pond on the fourth hole. During the shootout, at the end, we put one of the Kegerators on the back of a maintenance cart and had the golf-shop assistants drive it around:

Nick, Connor, Katie, and a Kegerator.

Nick, Connor, Katie, and a Kegerator.

Later, for some reason, Les took over.

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We still needed ice, for soft drinks and so forth, and to solve that problem we rented an entire ice freezer like the ones you see at liquor stores. It had its own trailer and was filled with ice bags, and we paid for just the bags we used. IMG_2484We no longer have the ice freezer, but the Kegerators are ours forever. We keep them in the men’s locker room, of course.